Pacific County Fire District No. 1

Community Education

Community Safety Division

Our Mission : Committing knowledge and resources to the improvement of safety for our community and its people.

Primary functions of the Public Education Coordinator include:

Pacific County Fire District #1 and the American Heart Association are dedicated to reducing the number of deaths caused by cardiovascular disease and stroke. One way they do this is by training people how to perform CPR to save the life of someone in cardiac arrest. The American Heart Association offers a variety of CPR classes for everyone, not just for medical professionals.

“As many as 400,000 people in the US will suffer from cardiac arrest this year. The majority of these individuals will die before even reaching the hospital”.*

It is a fact that if more people were trained in CPR, the number of survivors could double or triple. Statistics show that among the American population, 70% may not even respond to a cardiac arrest emergency because they are uneducated and do not know how to apply the lifesaving techniques of CPR. This is a sad statistic, and the American Heart Association’s mission is to improve these numbers.

By getting CPR certified, we are embracing the American Heart Association’s motto: “Learn and Live.”

Why Take American Heart Association CPR Classes?

  • Knowledge of CPR will give you the ability to save a life.
  • Your workplace or school may ask that you have your CPR certification.
  • You may work in a field that requires CPR as a skill, such as a firefighter or an EMT.

The classes teach students to save the lives of infants, children, and adults. Without knowing how to perform CPR, individuals cannot take action and lives are lost.

CPR Certification Courses for Healthcare Providers

  • Basic Life Support (BLS):This course is designed for people in the healthcare profession that may need CPR and other emergency response skills for their jobs. The BLS certification classes, including exams, take about 4.5 hours to complete.

CPR Certification Courses for non-Healthcare Providers

  • Heartsaver CPR AED: This classroom-based course will train you to be proficient in the use of CPR as well as an AED. If you need to get certified for a workplace or school requirement, then this is most likely the course you need to take.
  • Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED: This is the same as the Heartsaver CPR AED course but includes extra modules to learn the basics of responding to and managing a first aid emergency.

CPR Courses without Certification

  • Family & Friends® CPR: This CPR course teaches students the techniques to save a life through applying CPR to an infant or child, CPR with rescue breaths, adult Hands-Only® CPR, how to use an AED, and choking relief in an infant, child or adult. AHA’s practice-while-watching technique which helps to enhance students learning and retention.
  • Infant CPR Anytime:The Infant CPR Anytime educates individuals on how to apply CPR to infants and how to relieve choking infants. Choking is the #1 cause of accidental death in infants. This course comes in kit form and can be learned in the comfort of your own home in about 20 minutes. The course includes a baby-sized manikin. A smart choice for parents of newborn children.

 

Get Started

Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED: $55.00

Heartsaver CPR AED:  $35.00

Family & Friends® CPR: $15.00

Basic Life Support (BLS):  $35.00

Infant CPR Anytime: $15.00

To register for any of these classes please call Lani at (360) 665-4451

 

How long is my certification valid? The certifications granted by the AHA are valid for two years.

We are making a difference, but, it is still up to the general public to enroll in American Heart Association CPR Classes to save lives.

*Facts recorded by the American Heart Association.

Fire Prevention Week

Each year in October during National Fire Prevention week, Pacific County Fire District 1 personnel pays daily visits the students at Ocean Park Elementary School to teach fire safety and fire prevention. The curriculum is developed by Fire District 1, and coordinates with the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) theme for the year. Field trips are often arranged during this time for elementary and pre-school aged children to tour the fire station.

Students in all grades are encouraged to make a poster, illustrating what they’ve learned throughout the week, and to work with their families to make an escape plan for their homes. Poster contest winners are chosen from each classroom to ride in a fire engine and have lunch with the firefighters.

Senior Fall Prevention Program

 

Pacific County Fire District #1 offers free home assessments to Senior Citizens who live in the community. Home Safety Visits are a proven way to reduce fire injuries and deaths!

During the Home Safety Visits, we will:

  • Test/install smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms
  • Discuss fall prevention
  • Discuss cooking safety and general fire safety
  • Inspect the property to identify any potential safety issues
  • Fire Escape Planning
  • Community Resources & Programs

If you or someone you know could benefit from a home assessment call us at 360-665-4451 to request one.

 

Falls are a major threat to the health and independence of older adults, people aged 65 and older. Each year in the United States, nearly one-third of older adults experience a fall. Approximately one out of ten falls among older adults result in a serious injury, such as a hip fracture or head injury, that requires hospitalization. In addition to the physical and emotional pain, many people need to spend at least a year recovering in a long-term care facility. Some never return to their homes.

EXERCISE 
Keeping in good physical condition with moderate daily exercise will reduce your risk of falls. A combination of flexibility, weight bearing exercises and aerobic exercise can markedly improve your level of fitness-at any age.

    Regular exercise can:

  • Improve your muscle tone, strength and endurance.
        •    Keep joints, tendons and ligaments more flexible for unrestricted movement.
        •    Increase your sense of balance, agility and confidence.
        •    Strengthen your bones to fight osteoporosis and resist injury.
        •    Increase your stamina and energy. 

You should always talk to your health care provider before starting an exercise program.

SAFE HOME
Each year, thousands of older people fall at home. Falls are often due to hazards that are easy to fix. The Fall City Fire Department offers free home assessments to area senior citizens which will include recommendations for reducing home safety hazards and increasing safety through the installation of risk reduction devices such as night lights, smoke detectors, shower chairs, handheld shower head, non-slip shower mats, wall grab bars and toilet safety frames. If you or someone you know could benefit from a home assessment call the Fire Department at 425-222-5841 to request one.

    Lighting

    •    Use a night light to illuminate the path from your bed to the bathroom.
    •    Replace dim, burned out or glaring lights with bright soft white light bulbs.
    •    Place a lamp close to your bed where it’s easy to reach.
    •    Long hallways should have light switches at each end.

    Floors

    •    Keep walkways free of cords, clutter and other obstacles.
    •    Remove throw rugs; secure double sided tap under area rugs.
    •    Arrange furniture so that you have plenty of room to walk.

    Steps & Stairways

    •    All steps and stairs should have secure handrails on both sides.
    •    Fix loose and uneven outdoor steps.
    •    Carpet on indoor stairs should be firmly attached to every step.
    •    Attach non-slip rubber treads to wooden stairs.
    •    Stairs should be well lit with light switches at the top and bottom landings.

    Living Room & Bedroom

    •    Furniture should be easy for you to get in and out.
    •    Keep a phone on a low table within reach of the floor.

  • Keep a flashlight or battery operated light near your bed.
        •    Install night lights throughout your home.

        Bathrooms

        •    Only use non-skid rugs on the bathroom floor.
        •    Install wall grab bars by the toilet and inside the shower/tub area.
        •    Use a shower chair and handheld shower head.
        •    Place non-skid adhesive strips in the tub or non-skid mats.
        •    Install ADA height toilet (17″-19″ from floor to seat).

        Shoes 

        •    Your shoes should be lightweight and supportive.
        •    Low-heeled and non-skid. 
        •    Firmly fastened; velcro, cotton laces, or try nylon lock laces.

MEDICATION MANAGEMENT
Four out of five older adults take at least one prescription medication per day and most take at least 2 prescriptions a day. Drug interactions and the physical changes that come with age can lead to an increased risk of falling. While all drugs should be administered carefully, certain medicines are more likely to involve risk of falling then others, such as those affecting the central nervous and cardiovascular systems. The more medications are taken, the greater risk of risk of drug interactions and side effects. Symptoms can range from dizziness to drowsiness, vision impairment and loss of balance.

    •    Keep an updated list of your medications, include supplements, herbs and over       the counter products.
    •    Bring your medication list when you visit the doctor or hospital.
    •    Have all your medications filled at one pharmacy. 
    •    Ask your pharmacist or your doctor about drug interactions.
    •    Take your medications regularly, don’t skip or decrease the dose to cut cost.
    •    Avoid over-the-counter sleeping aids, allergy medications and antihistamines in     cough and cold products. 
    •    If you see a specialist, make sure your specialist sends reports to your primary         care doctor. 
    •    Always ask your doctor before you start an herbal supplement or over-the counter   remedy.
    •    Ask your pharmacist if your pills look different in any way (color, size, shape) than the previous prescription.
    •    Never use someone else’s medications and discard old unused medications. 
    •    Limit your use of alcohol.
    •    If you do experience dizziness, drowsiness, vision problems or loss of balance        seek help.
    •    Report adverse drug reactions to your doctor.

VISION CHECK
Eye disease or normal aging can make it difficult for seniors to read fine print, judge distance or identify objects clearly. These factors can lead them to develop a poor sense of balance or misread medicinal instructions. Have your vision checked annually and prescriptions updated as needed.

The three most common eye conditions in older adults are cataracts, glaucoma and macular degeneration. All of these conditions can develop slowly and gradually without symptoms until vision is impaired. A cataract is the thickening of the eye lens due to aging which causes gradual sight loss. Glaucoma is an increase in pressure inside the eye that causes gradual sight loss. Macular degeneration is the gradual loss of central vision. 

Reduced depth perception due to bifocals, reading glasses, low lighting, and some eye conditions can cause falls. Reduced depth perception makes it difficult to accurately judge walkway changes like curbs, steps, and uneven ground, and can affect driving skills. In addition, a loss of depth perception makes it difficult to see objects in areas of shadow, low lighting, nighttime darkness, or excessive brightness.

    Floors
                          
    
•    Keep walkways free of cords, clutter and other obstacles.
    •    Remove throw rugs; secure double sided tap under area rugs.
    •    Arrange furniture so that you have plenty of room to walk.

    Steps & Stairways
                     
    •    All steps and stairs should have secure handrails on both sides.
    •    Fix loose and uneven outdoor steps.
    •    Carpet on indoor stairs should be firmly attached to every step.
    •    Attach non-slip rubber treads to wooden stairs.
    •    Stairs should be well lit with light switches at the top and bottom landings.

    Living Room & Bedroom
             
    •    Furniture should be easy for you to get in and out.
    •    Keep a phone on a low table within reach of the floor.

   •   Keep a flashlight or battery operated light near your bed.
    •    Install night lights throughout your home.

    Bathrooms
                  
    •    Only use non-skid rugs on the bathroom floor.
    •    Install wall grab bars by the toilet and inside the shower/tub area.
    •    Use a shower chair and handheld shower head.
    •    Place non-skid adhesive strips in the tub or non-skid mats.
    •    Install ADA height toilet (17″-19″ from floor to seat).
    
    Shoes 
            
    •    Your shoes should be lightweight and supportive.
    •    Low-heeled and non-skid. 
    •    Firmly fastened; velcro, cotton laces, or try nylon lock laces.

 

MEDICATION MANAGEMENT
Four out of five older adults take at least one prescription medication per day and most take at least 2 prescriptions a day. Drug interactions and the physical changes that come with age can lead to an increased risk of falling. While all drugs should be administered carefully, certain medicines are more likely to involve risk of falling then others, such as those affecting the central nervous and cardiovascular systems. The more medications are taken, the greater risk of risk of drug interactions and side effects. Symptoms can range from dizziness to drowsiness, vision impairment and loss of balance.

    •    Keep an updated list of your medications, include supplements, herbs and over the counter products.
    •    Bring your medication list when you visit the doctor or hospital.
    •    Have all your medications filled at one pharmacy. 
    •    Ask your pharmacist or your doctor about drug interactions.
    •    Take your medications regularly, don’t skip or decrease the dose to cut cost.
    •    Avoid over-the-counter sleeping aids, allergy medications and antihistamines in cough and cold products. 
    •    If you see a specialist, make sure your specialist sends reports to your primary care doctor. 
    •    Always ask your doctor before you start an herbal supplement or over-the counter remedy.
    •    Ask your pharmacist if your pills look different in any way (color, size, shape) than the previous prescription.
    •    Never use someone else’s medications and discard old unused medications. 
    •    Limit your use of alcohol.
    •    If you do experience dizziness, drowsiness, vision problems or loss of balance seek help.
    •    Report adverse drug reactions to your doctor.

VISION CHECK
Eye disease or normal aging can make it difficult for seniors to read fine print, judge distance or identify objects clearly. These factors can lead them to develop a poor sense of balance or misread medicinal instructions. Have your vision checked annually and prescriptions updated as needed.

The three most common eye conditions in older adults are cataracts, glaucoma and macular degeneration. All of these conditions can develop slowly and gradually without symptoms until vision is impaired. A cataract is the thickening of the eye lens due to aging which causes gradual sight loss. Glaucoma is an increase in pressure inside the eye that causes gradual sight loss. Macular degeneration is the gradual loss of central vision. 

Reduced depth perception due to bifocals, reading glasses, low lighting, and some eye conditions can cause falls. Reduced depth perception makes it difficult to accurately judge walkway changes like curbs, steps, and uneven ground, and can affect driving skills. In addition, a loss of depth perception makes it difficult to see objects in areas of shadow, low lighting, nighttime darkness, or excessive brightness.

Baby Sitting and Classes

Do you feel ready to stay home alone, watch your brothers and sisters while your parents are gone, or babysit for younger children? Then maybe it’s time for Safe Sitter®. Safe Sitter® is for young teens in grades 6-8 who are ready to learn the skills they need to care for themselves and younger children.

In addition, Safe Sitter® teaches young teens life and business skills, so that they know how to be prepared, be responsible, and be considerate whether they are babysitting or doing odd jobs for family, friends, or neighbors.

You’ll have fun. You’ll learn a lot. And at the end of the day, you can proudly say, “I am a Safe Sitter®!”

Babysitting Classes Pacific County Fire District 1 is a registered Safe Sitter teaching site. The curriculum includes First Aid and CPR, behavior management, appropriate ways to entertain different age groups, and what to do in an emergency. Classes are planned twice each year to coordinate with the School District schedule: one during the Spring Break, and one at the start of Summer Vacation.

The Safe Sitter Babysitting Class is a 2-day class, which costs $25 per student

Fire Extinguisher Training

Our fire extinguisher training course enables you to manage fire situations in the workplace. Our bespoke training provides you with all the knowledge and practical experience needed to contain a fire at work.

It’s essential that everyone knows how to use a fire extinguisher safely and effectively. Our team of trainers have years of experience working in the fire service and are perfectly qualified to improve your fire extinguisher theory and practical experience. Our fire extinguisher training course ensures that your company complies with all relevant regulations.

The course will greatly benefit anyone who may need to operate fire extinguishers and other fire fighting equipment, the incorrect operation of which is ineffective and can in some cases be dangerous.

As with all our courses the fire extinguisher training we offer is based on the needs of your workplace as determined by your fire risk assessment, as well as your emergency procedures. The course will address all aspects of your risk assessment and ensure that you have the knowledge and understanding to carry out procedures as necessary.

Car Seat Program

 

Where and when can I get my child’s car seat installed/inspected?

Pacific County Fire District #1 has a car seat technician that inspects and can assist with installation for car seats by appointment only.
What do I need to bring to a car seat inspection if I need a new seat?
The vehicle, the parent or guardian, the child, the current seat, and an interpreter if the parent doesn’t speak English.

Do I have to live in Pacific County to get a car seat or have one checked?

We can check anyone’s seat. If you need a seat, you must live in Pacific County. If you live in another county, contact your local Safe Kids Coalition for assistance.

Can I get a car seat checked if I’m still pregnant?

Absolutely! There is no requirement for the child to be present during a car seat check. It is strongly encouraged, but not required. There is no fee for this service.

When can my child turn forward facing?

A child under the age of two years must be properly secured in a child restraint system that is rear-facing until the child reaches the weight or height limit of the child restraint system as set by the manufacturer. A child may continue to be properly secured in a child restraint system that is rear-facing until the child reaches the weight or height limit of the child restraint system as set by the manufacturer, as recommended by the American academy of pediatrics.

When can my child use a booster seat?

Booster seats are for older children who have outgrown the forward-facing car seat (check car seat’s height or weight maximums). A belt-positioning booster seat is used until the vehicle’s lap-and-should seat belt fits properly. Booster seats must be used with a lap AND shoulder belt. If your child climbs out of the booster seat or will not sit upright for an entire trip, it is not safe and too soon to switch. Find a car seat with harness that will fit his/her height and weight.

NEVER use a booster seat with lap belt only! It requires a lap and shoulder belt.

When does my child no longer need to use a booster seat?

Children are large enough to use the vehicle seat belt typically when they reach 4’9″ tall and are between 8 and 12 years of age. Most children will not fit seat belts without a booster seat until 10 or 11 years of age. Children should always use lap and shoulder seat belts for optimal protection. 

When can my child sit in the front seat?

WA State law, RCW 46.61.687, requires children to sit in the back seat until they are 13 years old.

 

 

 

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